bunks

Day 1: Welcoming and a bear shooting 

Morning campers.
It is currently 6:10 in this eerie woodland that I will call home for the next 8 weeks. The air is fresh and cool with morning dew and last night’s rain. North, south, east and west you can hear different animals chirp, welcoming the new day. 



After 15 hours of travelling, I finally made it to camp last night. Although this was ~midnight English time, the camp was still in full swing with pre-camp activities (before the campers turn up, the staff are trained in what we call pre-camp). 
Yesterday evening I was greeted by my old uni friend Rob and his girlfriend to a broad campsite filled with young adults keen to start their summer. 

The cabins are made of brick and wood, with light-coloured wood paneling on the interiors. 


I learnt about all of these as Rob took me on a personal tour of our temporary home. Rob is now head of ropes, meaning he managers other workers on the canopy course and the climbing wall. As a head, he is granted a walkie-talkie in case of emergencies, just like the one we had last night.The camp is much wider than it is long, as it straddles a lake. There is a skateboard park, two “beaches”, an archery course, football, basketball and beach volleyball courts, a tuck shop and a freeweights gym. 

As Rob was leading us around, someone buzzed in over the radio something about a bear on site.

Now, we are in the Canadian woodland so bears are common, however they usually keep away from camp. 

Rob and I continued on our tour and eventually came to the area with other senior members of staff where standing with caution. The bear was close. 

Immediately after we reached them, a man approached us with a gun, and caught sight of the bear cub just behind us. I turned to see the first sight of a wide animal of this size, it was roughly the size of a grown Dalmatian. 

Sadly, due to safety, the bear was then shot twice, right in front of my eyes. RIP Mr Bear. 
The rest of the evening was slightly less exciting, but still amusing. There were evening activities such as human hungry hungry hippos, a lip sync battle and Apple stacking. 

After this, I made my way back to my cabin, unpacked my stuff and went to bed. 

Who’d have thought that sleeping in a wooden bunkhouse would be so cold? 
Peace, BA.